54.91.35.130
The Aizenberg Biomineralization and Biomimetics Lab

The Aizenberg Biomineralization and Biomimetics Lab

Home Research Publications Group Members News Affiliations
  You are here: Home    Research overview

Slippery surfaces

Adaptive hybrid architectures

Self-assembly

Research overview

In the course of evolution, Nature has developed strategies that endow biological processes and materials with exquisite selectivity, specificity, and adaptability. This is wonderfully exemplified in the realm of inorganic materials formation by organisms, so-called "biomineralization", and in the self-assembled dynamic structures that enable organisms to respond to a constantly changing environment.

Learning from and mastering Nature's concepts not only satisfies humankind's insatiable curiosity for understanding the world around us, but also promises to drive a paradigm shift in modern materials science and technology.

The Aizenberg lab's research is aimed at understanding some of the basic principles of biological architectures and the economy with which biology solves complex problems in the design of multifunctional, adaptive materials. The goal is to use biological principles as guidance in developing new, bio-inspired synthetic routes and nanofabrication strategies that would lead to advanced materials and devices, with broad implications in fields ranging from architecture to energy efficiency to medicine.

Dr. Aizenberg is one of the pioneers of this rapidly developing field of bioinspired materials design. The lab pursues a wide range of research interests that include biomineralization, self-assembly, adaptive materials, crystal engineering, surface wettability, nanofabrication, biooptics, biomaterials, and biomechanics.


Bionanointerfaces

Crystal Growth

Biological engineering principles

Wettability

Fabrication of nanostructured surfaces

Bio-inspired optics
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
Copyright by Prof. J. Aizenberg, A. Grinthal and M. Kolle 2011
This website was last updated in the section
"Individual research projects: Biological and medical applications at 08:37:05 on 10-21-2014.