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Controlling Liquid Crystal Orientations for Programmable Anisotropic Transformations in Cellular Microstructures (Adv. Mater. 42/2021)

Our recent research featured a cover picture on Advanced Materials!!

February 15, 2022

Our recent research on "Controlling Liquid Crystal Orientations for Programmable Anisotropic Transformations in Cellular Microstructures" have featured a cover picture on Advanced Materials (https://onlinelibrary-wiley-com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/doi/10.1002/adma.202170327). 

In article number 2105024, Joanna Aizenberg, Katia Bertoldi, and co-workers report that by programming independently anisotropy at the molecular and structural levels, unprecedented director-determined symmetry...

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Ten Wyss faculty members were determined to be among the most highly cited researchers by Web of Science Group.

Wyss Institute Celebrates Highly Cited and Top Translational Researchers

November 20, 2020
  (BOSTON) — Web of Science Group has announced Highly Cited Researchers 2020 list, which identifies researchers who demonstrated significant influence in their chosen field or fields through the publication of multiple highly cited papers during the last decade. Their names are drawn from the publications that rank in the top 1% by citations for field and... Read more about Wyss Institute Celebrates Highly Cited and Top Translational Researchers
Composite rendering that transitions from a glassy sponge skeleton on the left to a welded rebar-based lattice on the right, highlighting the biologically inspired nature of the research.

Marine sponges inspire the next generation of skyscrapers and bridges

September 21, 2020
When we think about sponges, we tend to think of something soft and squishy. But researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are using the glassy skeletons of marine sponges as inspiration for the next generation of stronger and taller buildings, longer bridges, and lighter spacecraft. ... Read more about Marine sponges inspire the next generation of skyscrapers and bridges
Integrating Variable Signals in Hydrogels

Highlight: Integrating Variable Signals in Hydrogels

July 2, 2020
All living organisms have systems that can link multiple signals to manage tasks. For example, humans have systems of organs that can combine inputs from sight, hearing, and smell in a fear response that can cause our hearts to speed up. This ability—called complex signal integration—is not found in artificial systems. This new study demonstrates a pathway for simple, soft artificial materials to use multiple signals from external sources to produce distinct responses. ... Read more about Highlight: Integrating Variable Signals in Hydrogels
Image of Joanna Aizenberg

Joanna Aizenberg elected member of National Academy of Engineering

February 12, 2019

Today, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) announced that Joanna Aizenberg, Ph.D., has been elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). She is recognized for her exceptional “contributions to [the] understanding of biological systems and bioinspired materials design”.

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